The Good Friday Agreement And A Hard Border

7 Scope 2 of the GCC created new institutional and political structures which depended inextricably on the fact that the Irish border was a normal intra-European border and that both States were members of the European Union. Guideline 2 provided for the creation of a North-South Council of Ministers (NSMC) which drew heavily on the model of the European Council of Ministers5. In addition to this executive cross-border institution, it provided for the creation of implementing bodies to promote cross-border cooperation in various socio-economic sectors such as agriculture, tourism or trade. One of these bodies, the European Union Programme Special Unit (SEUPB), was set up to monitor EU funding on a cross-border basis. Policy Exchange calls itself a “leading think tank in the UK”. She has published a number of articles on the Irish border issue, written by former Irish Ambassador Ray Bassett (Senior Fellow for European Affairs) and Graham Gudgin (Chief Economic Adviser). I only linked a few articles. You will find others by clicking on the nominative links. The Belfast-Good Friday Agreement does not exclude Northern Ireland or Ireland from the establishment of cross-border checkpoints and other security measures. However, one of the explicit objectives of the UK Withdrawal Agreement is to minimise physical border controls. “The Irish border issue must be kept in mind.” (5 Feb 17) Graham Gudgin (Prospect Magazine) As Britain and the EU continue to discuss how to avoid a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, I have collected a number of articles from different angles that address the issue.

I`m not saying it covers all of that, but can be a useful starting point. If anyone knows of any other informative reports, please let me know or add them to the comments.. . .